health & social care
2

3rd Annual Identifying and Tackling Sepsis in Healthcare Conference

health & social care

08:45 - 15:40

Wednesday 3 April 2019

Prospero House- etc Venues, Central London

This Forum provides attendees with an excellent opportunity to examine successful methods of identifying and treating sepsis. Attendees will hear from sector leaders on how best to educate and train healthcare staff to ensure sepsis is identified at the earliest possible stage. Furthermore, best practice case studies will share successful methods for improving sepsis treatment through screening and effectively using technology, as well as how best to raise awareness around sepsis at a local level.

Audience

This Forum is specifically designed for the Health Sector including

  • Sepsis Leads/Consultants
  • Heads of Quality
  • Clinical Research Nurses
  • Critical Care Leads
  • Matrons
  • Outreach and Community Leads
  • Patient Safety Managers
  • Infection and Prevention and Control Nurses
  • Sepsis Nurses
  • Senior Lecturers

This Forum is also open to the Voluntary and Private Sectors to encourage debate and networking.

Key Speakers Confirmed:
  • Emily Handley-Cole, Learning Disability Mortality Review (LeDeR) Programme, NHS England
  • Dr Ron Daniels, President, Sepsis Trust
  • Dr Andrew Frankel, Postgraduate Dean for South London and Clinical Lead for Sepsis, Health Education England (HEE)
  • Dr Gary Wares, Clinical Lead for Sepsis, Health Education England (HEE)
  • Dr Alison Tavare, GP Clinical Lead, West of England Academic Health Science Network
View the agenda and additional speakers

08:45

Registration, Refreshments and Networking


09:30

Chair's Welcome Address

Dr. Michael Porter, Lecturer in Medical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire (CONFIRMED)


09:40

An Interview With the Sepsis Trust: The Future of Sepsis Identification and Treatment

Questions from the chair and attendees, topics to include:

  • What key lessons can the UK learn from aboard and the World Health Organisation in regard to sepsis identification and treatment?
  • How can we best ensure a sector wide approach, which includes general practice, emergency services, and community healthcare organisations, is being taken to tackle sepsis?
  • What are the next steps needed across the UK healthcare sector to ensure sepsis related deaths continue to decline and early identification improves

Dr Ron Daniels, President, Sepsis Trust (CONFIRMED)


10:10

Morning Keynote: Promoting Professional Training to Improve Early Sepsis Diagnosis Rates

  • Outlining HEE’s online ‘Think Sepsis’ package, designed to help clinicians spot the early sign of sepsis in primary care and paediatrics. 
  • Highlighting the impact ‘Think Sepsis’ has had on staff development and sepsis diagnosis rates since launching.
  • Promoting resources available to support staff training in detecting sepsis early, such as innovative interactive film which outlines the common factors that prevent early diagnosis in children.
  • Sharing guidance on how trusts and hospitals can embed ‘sepsis champions’ into their strategies as a method to identify and tackle sepsis more effectively

Dr Andrew Frankel, Postgraduate Dean for South London and Clinical Lead for Sepsis & Dr Gary Wares, Clinical Lead for Sepsis, Health Education England (HEE) (CONFIRMED)


10:30

Questions and Answers Session


10:40

Refreshments and Networking


11:00

Case Studies: Reducing Sepsis Deaths Amongst People with Learning Disabilities

Emily Handley-Cole, Premature Mortality Governance & Development Lead & London Regional Coordinator – Learning Disability Mortality Review (LeDeR) Programme, NHS England (CONFIRMED)


11:20

Case Study: Embedding Technology into Healthcare Initiatives to Reduce Sepsis Mortality Rates

  • Outlining how CUH implemented the Trust’s revolutionary eHospital digital transformation as a method to improve patient care outcomes across the hospital
  • Evaluating the success of CUH’s Epic electronic patient record system (EPR) in reducing sepsis mortality rates by 42%, by preventing adverse medication reactions through electronic prescribing and clinical decision support
  • Sharing guidance on building and embedding electronic alerts into hospital staff procedures, including the impact this has on reducing Sepsis related deaths
  • Highlighting the key challenges faced when introducing the hospitals EPR system, such as ensuring a smooth tradition and effective implementation

Dr Sian Coggle, Acute Medicine Speciality Lead & Consultant Acute Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Cambridge University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust (CONFIRMED)


11:40

Questions and Answers Session


12:00

Lunch and Networking


13:00

Afternoon Keynote: Working in Partnership to Ensure More Synchronised Sepsis Care Pathways: A GP's Perspective

  • Outlining how GP’s can embed sepsis identification tools into their care process, including the importance of primary care and secondary care organisations working together to ensure a sector wide approach to tackling sepsis
  • Discussing how GPs and community carers can work more closely with nurses, trusts and first responders, such as the ambulance service to improve sepsis identification and ensure treatment takes place as quickly as possible
  • Sharing guidance on how community care organisations and GPs can create robust plans for treating likely sepsis patients, including involving acute care providers to ensure a more synchronised care pathway for sepsis patients
  • Examining how care and identification of sepsis cases has improved among GPs and community care and the key lessons learnt so far

Dr Alison Tavare, GP Clinical Lead, West of England Academic Health Science Network (CONFIRMED)


13:20

Case Study: Improving Sepsis Treatment Through Antibiotic Stewardship Research

  • Outlining the world-first £1.5million study to understand how best to antibiotics more effectively when treating sepsis and tackle the growing issue of antibiotic resistance
  • Sharing the initial findings from the research programme, including whether it is possible to safely reduce the time patients in hospital with suspected sepsis are kept on antibiotics
  • Examining the key challenges faced in conducting the programme and the importance of working collaboratively between Warwick Medical School’s Clinical Trials Unit, NICE and Salford Royal – The University of Manchester
  • Highlighting the next steps of the programme after the pilot phase, including widening the programme to more than 2,700 patients at 30 NHS hospitals across the UK

Professor Paul Dark, Professor of Critical Care Medicine, Salford RoyalThe University of Manchester & Specialty Lead in Critical Care, National Institute for Health Research National (NIHR) (CONFIRMED)


13:40

Case Study: Working in Partnership to Raise Awareness of Sepsis

  • Examining how East and North Hertfordshire NHS Trust created easy to read leaflets to help improving parents’ awareness and ability to identify early signs of sepsis
  • Sharing best practice guidance on how trusts can establish partnerships with local stakeholders, including councils and charities, to implement effective health awareness campaigns
  • Outlining how the trust and its partners ensured the campaign was targeted at the necessary audience and examining how this was achieved

Anne Hunt, Lead Sepsis Nurse, East and North Hertfordshire NHS Trust & Dr Jane Greaves, Senior Lecturer – Department: Nursing, Midwifery & Health, Northumbria University (CONFIRMED)


14:10

Questions and Answers Session


14:40

Refreshments and Networking


15:00

Panel Session: The Next Steps in Overcoming the Challenges in Sepsis Diagnosis, Management and Recovery

  • Assessing the major challenges hospitals and trusts face when tackling sepsis and possible solutions to overcome them
  • Debating potential solutions for adapting and improving sepsis care and identification, including a wider system approach including ambulance services, acute care units and primary care services
  • Examining the importance of technology in tackling sepsis death rates and how it can be further embedded across the health sector, including the use of AI technology
  • Discussing methods of implementing successful sepsis recovery pathways throughout the care system, including the roles played by primary and secondary care organisations

Dr. Michael Porter, Lecturer in Medical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire (CONFIRMED)

Dr Aldo Faisal, Reader in Neurotechnology, Department of Bioengineering and the Department of Computing, Imperial College London (CONFIRMED)

Anthony Gordon MD, Professor of Anaesthesia and Critical Care, Imperial College London (CONFIRMED)

Anne Hunt, Lead Sepsis Nurse, East and North Hertfordshire NHS Trust (CONFIRMED)


15:40

Chair's Closing Remarks

*programme subject to change


According to recent research from Harvard Medical School and Imperial College London (ICL), the Sepsis death rate in Britain is five times higher than in the best-performing country in Europe. Furthermore, there were 15,722 sepsis-related deaths in UK hospitals or within a month of discharge in the year ending April 2017. Demonstrating that the UK is clearly failing to keep up with other wealthy nations’ progress on cutting sepsis mortality.

To help tackle the growing issue of sepsis, NHS England released their Second Sepsis Action Plan in September 2017. The plan outlines the areas across the healthcare sector which are in vital need of improvement. These include: ensuring sepsis is identified earlier, high-quality education and training for staff, and embedding safety netting across the system. In addition, to ensure standards of diagnosis and care remain high and continue to improve, the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) updated their sepsis guidelines and quality standards. The Sepsis: Recognition, Diagnosis, and Early Management report stated that better communication between primary and secondary care is vital to ensure the standardisation in early diagnosis of sepsis.

With sepsis rates continuing to rise across the UK, it is vital that trusts, CCGs and hospitals come together and reduce the number of preventable deaths resulting from sepsis. Therefore, it is crucial that innovative partnerships are established to utilise technology, share knowledge and train staff to ensure that sepsis symptoms are identified early, and treatment is undertaken rapidly and efficiently.

Anne Hunt RGN MSc, Sepsis Lead Nurse, East & North Hertfordshire NHS Trust

Anne is a registered nurse with critical care and emergency nursing experience. She has been the Lead nurse for Sepsis at East and North Hertfordshire NHS Trust since February 2017. Anne is studying for a Doctorate in Health Research at the University of Hertfordshire researching the Experience of Sepsis amongst Adults with Learning Disabilities and those who care for them.

Anne will be talking about the actions East & North Hertfordshire NHS Trust are taking to improve the care and outcomes for people with learning disabilities who require acute health care.

Dr Aldo Faisal, Reader in Neurotechnology, Department of Bioengineering and the Department of Computing, Imperial College London

Dr Faisal is the founding director of the £20Mio UKRI Centre in AI for Healtchare. He is Associate Professor jointly at the Dept. of Bioengineering and the Dept. of Computing at Imperial College London, and leads the  Behaviour Analytics Lab at the Data Science Institute. He is Associate Investigator at the MRC London Institute of Medical Sciences and holds honorary positions at Oxford and UCL. Aldo serves as an Associate editor for Nature Scientific Data and PLOS Computational Biology was elected to the Global Futures Council of the World Economic Forum.

Dr. Michael Porter, Lecturer in Medical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire

Dr. Michael J. Porter is a specialist in Molecular Genetics. Currently his research interests include the use of multimedia to enhance the student experience and authentic teaching/assessment. His scientific research is primarily in the areas of Dermatology, particularly metastatic melanoma (skin cancer) and Sepsis. Other interests include the biological/psychological impact of stress, the role of epigenetic modification during pregnancy and the impacts of vaping / highly caffeinated soft drinks etc.

He is a fellow of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) and the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS), as well as a member of The Royal Society of Biology and The Royal Society of Chemistry.

He is also heavily engaged in encouraging the public’s understanding and engagement with science; making appearances, nationally and internationally, on Radio and Television. He also writes for various national and international newspapers.”

Dr Alison Tavare, GP Clinical Lead, West of England Academic Health Science Network

Alison is a Bristol GP and Primary Care clinical lead at the West of England AHSN.

The ‘Deteriorating Patient’ team led a regional collaboration between out of hospital clinicians, the ambulance service, and acute trusts using NEWS as a common language at handover. This system wide approach resulted in a measured reduction from mortality from ‘suspicion of sepsis’ and the West of England AHSN won the BMJ Awards 2018 ‘Patient Safety Team of the Year’ and the HSJ 2018 award for the ‘Deteriorating Patients and Rapid Response Systems’.

The team are supporting the national adoption and spread of NEWS2 out of hospital and also working with NHSE developing a regional strategy to improve outcomes for people with learning disability.

[email protected]

Dr Sian Coggle, Acute Medicine Speciality Lead & Consultant Acute Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Cambridge University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Sian trained at St Mary’s Hospital in London. After completing rotations in London she moved to Cambridge University Hospital trust to specialise in Infectious Diseases and General Medicine. She has completed an MSc in Epidemiology and a Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She is now a Consultant in Acute Medicine and Infectious Diseases at CUH, Trust Clinical Lead for Sepsis and Clinical Lead for Acute Medicine. She is a Fellow of the Royal College of Medicine

Dr Andrew Frankel, Postgraduate Dean for South London and Clinical Lead for Sepsis, Health Education England (HEE)

Dr Frankel works at the Imperial College Kidney and Transplant Centre, which is one of the largest renal units in Europe with a dialysis population of over 1600 patients and performing approximately 150 renal transplants per year. Dr Frankel has an interest in the pathogenesis and management of diabetic renal disease and leads the Diabetic Renal Clinical Research Group at the Imperial Renal and Transplant Centre.  Dr Frankel is the editor of the national guideline for the management of diabetes in patients on haemodialysis and is on the editorial board of the guidelines for the management of diabetes in patients with CKD.  

Dr Frankel was HEE South London Postgraduate Dean from 2013 to 2018. He provided local leadership for education and training across all healthcare professions but particularly in relation postgraduate medical training where he acted as the responsible officer for the 3500 trainees working in south London.  In addition, Dr Frankel was the editor of the Reference Guide for Specialty Training in the UK “Gold Guide” from 2014 until his retirement.  Dr Frankel was the national lead for the development of primary care training hubs and the national lead for HEEs response to developing programs to improve the management of patients with sepsis.

Professor Paul Dark, Professor of Critical Care Medicine, Salford Royal - The University of Manchester & Specialty Lead in Critical Care, National Institute for Health Research National (NIHR)

Paul Dark is Chair of Critical Care Medicine in the Division of Infection and Immunity, and Research Professor in Humanitarian and Conflict Response at The University of Manchester. He is also National Speciality Lead in Critical Care for the National Institute of Health Research at King’s College London. He leads a national programme of research in rapid diagnostic technologies aimed at improving the effectiveness of antimicrobial treatments in severe infection/sepsis leading to the best patient and population outcomes.

You May Also Like