primary & secondary education
2

3rd Annual Progress and Attainment 8 in Schools Forum

primary & secondary education

08:45 - 15:40

Thursday 14 March 2019

The Hatton- etc Venues, Central London

This Forum provides participants with the opportunity to examine successful methods of adapting and improving Progress 8 and Attainment scores. Attendees will gain insight from Ofsted and leading policy figures on the implications of Progress 8 on inspections and the role it has on measuring overall progression and attainment levels. In addition, best practice case studies will share guidance on how to adapt to the Progress 8 process, demonstrate improvement, measure impact and maximise attainment to ensure high-quality outcomes for students by achieving a high Progress 8 score.

Audience

This Forum is specifically designed for Schools, including:

  • Headteachers
  • Assistant & Deputy Headteachers
  • Principals and Vice Principals
  • Heads of Year
  • Directors & Heads of Curriculum
  • Directors and Heads of Assessment
  • Subject Leads
  • School Standards Officers

This Forum is also open to Local Government to encourage networking and discussion.

Key Speakers Confirmed:
  • Lee Northern HMI, Specialist Adviser, Inspection Policy and Quality, Ofsted
  • Jon Andrews, Deputy Head of Research, Education Policy Institute (EPI)
  • Rob Campbell, Member of National Executive and Chair of Secondary Council, National Association of Headteachers (NAHT)
  • Frank Green, Former National Schools Commissioner, Department for Education (DfE) and Chair, Challenger Multi-Academy Trust
  • Dr Tom Perry, Lecturer, MA School Improvement and Educational Leadership, University of Birmingham, and Research Associate, Centre for the Use of Research and Evidence in Education (CUREE) 
View the agenda and additional speakers

08:45

Registration, Refreshments and Networking


09:40

Chair's Welcome Address

Dr Tom Perry, Lecturer, MA School Improvement and Educational Leadership, University of Birmingham, and Research Associate, Centre for the Use of Research and Evidence in Education (CUREE) (CONFIRMED)


09:50

Morning Keynote: Reflecting on The Progress 8 Journey So Far

  • What is Attainment 8 a measure of? What are the potential problems with Attainment 8?
  • What are Progress measures? Where have these come from and why?
  • What do Progress measures tell us about school performance? What are the limitations/challenges of Progress measures? What does the research say about value-added measures?

Dr Tom Perry, Teaching Fellow, MA School Improvement and Educational Leadership, University of Birmingham, and Research Associate, Centre for the Use of Research and Evidence in Education (CUREE) (CONFIRMED)


10:10

Special Keynote: Understanding the Affect of Progress 8 and Attainment 8 on School Inspections

  • Outlining how Progress 8 can be reconciled with Ofsted school inspections as a method to ensure pupil progression and attainment are achievable
  • Examining how Ofsted take additional factors that affect the ability to progress into account when evaluating Progress 8 scores, including special needs and schools in deprived areas of the UK
  • Understanding how inspections have changed since the introduction of Progress 8 and the future of inspections going forward
  • Analysing the relationship between underperforming pupils and Progress 8 results, including how this impacts school inspections
  • Highlighting the next steps for Ofsted in tackling schools artificially boosting their progress 8 scores to improve their position in league tables

Lee Northern HMI, Specialist Adviser, Inspection Policy and Quality, Ofsted (CONFIRMED)


10:40

Questions and Answers Session


11:10

Refreshments and Networking


11:30

Case Study: Measuring Process and Attainment in Disadvantaged Areas

  • Outlining the difference between Progress 8 measures for disadvantaged and non disadvantaged children/areas
  • Exampling how does the difference vary and what can we learn from this data
  • Looking at whether suggested curriculum narrowing / more slots to fill is disproportionally affecting disadvantaged pupils.
  • Highlighting what schools can do to support the progress of disadvantaged children and what more can central and local government do to support the progress of disadvantaged students

Angela Donkin, Chief Social Scientist, National Foundation for Educational Research (CONFIRMED)


11:50

Question and Answers Session


12:00

Workshop: How Local Authorities Can Effectively Support Schools to Improve Pupil Progression and Attainment

Gain insights from a leading local council on how schools can build successful relationships with their local council and improve Progress and Attainment 8 scores, topics discussed will include:

  • Outlining how local councils can support schools to adopt a whole-school data approach to raise attainment and ensure pupils are effectively progressing in their education
  • Highlighting the services Ealing Council offer their schools to improve pupil progression and attainment, such as assessing insights on utilising data analysis
  • Sharing guidance on how Ealing Council work with local schools to improve pupil development across the borough, including advice on how schools can build a successful relationship with their councils
  • Examining the importance of schools effectively tracking their pupils achievements, including advice on how councils can support schools with this and what Ealing Council do to achieve this successfully

Angela Doherty, Quality and Partnerships Lead 11-19, Ealing Learning Partnership/Ealing London Borough Council & Ruth Baker, Director of Curriculum, The Cardinal Wiseman Catholic School (CONFIRMED)


13:00

Lunch and Networking


14:00

Afternoon Keynote Panel: Addressing the Challenges and How to Overcome Them to Improve the Progress 8 System

Join leaders from across the education sector to assess how schools can best tackle the challenges that arise from Progress 8, topics of discussion will include:

  • Assessing the major challenges schools have faced in the two years since Progress 8 has been implemented and possible solutions to overcome them
  • Debating potential solutions for adapting Progress 8, including the role of Ofsted or School Leaders throughout this process
  • Examining this issue of schools off-rolling underperforming pupils and how the process of Progress and Attainment 8 could be adapted to stop this from happening
  • Discussing what the future landscape and Progress 8 framework is likely to look like and the areas DfE should focus on to better support schools in achieving high attainment scores

Frank Green, Former National Schools Commissioner, Department for Education (DfE) and Chair, Challenger Multi-Academy Trust (CONFIRMED)

Jon Andrews, Deputy Head of Research, Education Policy Institute (EPI) (CONFIRMED)

Rob Campbell, Member of National Executive and Chair of Secondary Council, National Association of Headteachers (NAHT) (CONFIRMED)


14:30

Refreshments and Networking


14:50

Case Study: Demonstrating How to Effectively Improve a School’s Progress 8 Score

  • Outlining the journey of significantly improving the schools Progress 8 score by a third, from -0.36 in 2017 to 0.04 in 2018
  • Examining the impact of adapting school rules to facilitate enhancing learning outcomes and increased progress 8, as well as outlining how this impact was measures
  • Sharing guidance on how the school effectively embedded a culture of learning and discussion among all pupils and staff to help improve the schools Progress 8 score by a third
  • Highlighting how schools can effectively allocate time and resources, as well as achieving buy-in from all staff throughout the process of improving attainment levels

Ciara Warnock, Headteacher, Orchard Park High School (CONFIRMED)


15:10

Case Study: Successfully Redesigning the Curriculum to Reflect Progress 8

  • Sharing guidance on how to redesign effective curriculum models, which has seen the academies achieve +0.48 and +0.36 progress 8 scores
  • Highlighting how Glenmoor & Winton Academies supports and develops their staff to ensure a greater impact on learning and assessment throughout the school, including freedom to develop effective teaching curriculums
  • Outlining the recourses used to successfully redesign the curriculum and offer more extracurricular activities, including the importance of senior governance buy-in throughout this process
  • Examining how offering a robust curriculum alongside varied opportunities, such as extra-curricular provision and social time, can help develop vocational learning and improve pupil progression

Ben Antell, Executive Principal, Glenmorr and Winton Academies (CONFIRMED)


15:30

Questions and Answers Session


15:40

Chair's Closing Remarks

*programme subject to change


Two years on from the implementation of Progress and Attainment 8, the Department for Education league tables saw 365 mainstream secondary schools fall below the DfE’s floor standard, up from 282 in 2017. This included 6 schools who were previously rated ‘outstanding’ by Ofsted, highlighting the fact that significant improvements to education can still be made.

Since its introduction, Progress 8 has come under intense analysis and criticism from school leaders. Issues around underperforming pupils being ‘off-rolled’ to improve a school’s score, additional factors that may affect the ability of pupils to progress, such as schools in areas of deprivation, have not been fully considered and the impact of the new GSCE grading system has yet to be felt. To tackle some of these rising concerns, Ofsted have stated that they will be clamping down on schools artificially boosting their Progress 8 scores to change the league tables and how school inspections can work hand in hand with Progress 8.

It is vitally important that schools are effectively implementing Progress 8 and Attainment 8 measures to ensure their pupils’ progress and achieve their full potential. It is therefore essential that schools come together and share the lessons they have learnt within these two years of Progress 8 to improve the system and raise student outcomes across the UK.

Angela Donkin, Chief Social Scientist, National Foundation for Educational Research

 

NFER’s Chief Social Scientist, Angela Donkin, contributes to ensuring that NFER’s policy and practice-focused research and analysis is responsive to the evidence and insight needs of the education community. She has an international reputation as an expert on early years and inequalities in children’s attainment. As an expert on tackling inequality, and from over 25 years working in government and academia, her specialist knowledge covers children, education, work, income, and drivers of health outcomes.

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